Britax Advocate 70 Car Seat Review – Two Overlooked Reasons to Love It

It is no secret that I am a HUGE fan of the Britax Advocate car seat. It’s the car seat I have come to rely on for younger children for many reasons. Some of these reasons are the Advocate’s high rating for crash tests, high quality construction and the company’s excellent customer service. While all those are important, I want to mention a few often overlooked reasons why I consider the Britax Advocate to be the top of the line for convertible car seats.

The first reason is the near perfect angle at which the car seat is positioned once installed. For many convertible infant seats, the angle will position your child comfortably when rear facing but leave him or her sitting far too upright when forward facing or vice versa. Some of the lower priced units on the market even manage to avoid proper reclining in BOTH positions. The Advocate doesn’t have this problem. No matter if you are using the seat in rear facing mode for a young infant or as a forward facing seat for your eleven month old, you will find that the Advocate’s reclining angle is perfect in both situations. An easy way to see this is when your child falls asleep during a drive. In the old Evanflo convertible we used to use, my eldest daughter would always end up slumping forward when snoozing during a road trip, even after we worked the seat’s base adjustment to its limit. It just wouldn’t recline back far enough for her.

The next point is general comfort. This seems to be something many car seat makers couldn’t care less about. Try this experiment: Go to your local Target, Walmart or other mass retailer in your area and look at some of the selections they offer for car seats. Slip your fingers between the main molded part of the seat and feel the foam cushioning. Notice anything? Many will seem to have practically no real padding at all. At best, some have nothing more than about a quarter inch of cheap foam. Do they really expect a thirty pound child to be comfortable in that? Just looking at the Britax Advocate will tell you it is totally different. The design for the padding and how it is attached to the seat gives more the impression of an overstuffed recliner. That is exactly the kind of comfort I wanted for my little one. Think of it like this: If you had to spend four hours in a car, would you rather be in comfort, or strapped into the equivalent of one of those cheap, plastic desk chairs from a college lecture hall?

I know most people are primarily interested in safety when it comes to car seats. Yes, safety should still be your highest concern. Every car seat maker likes to trumpet the safety ratings of its products in all of its literature, and you will actually have to look hard to find a seat that doesn’t have at least a decent safety rating. The points I’ve gone over mainly deal with your child’s comfort when traveling. What I’d like to make clear is that with the Britax Advocate, you can easily have both safety and comfort. This is why I’ve switched to using it for my child, and why I recommend it to others.

Another thing you can face while maintaining a car is a cigarette smoke smell inside it. Tobacco smell tends to stick very hard to your car's interior elements. Fixing it may be costly. To succeed, you need to know exactly how to get cigarette smell out of car and how not to let it get back again. The latter is easier - you don't smoke again inside or simply switch to vaping. If you don't know what it is - it's a process of inhaling nicotine with other ingredients present in a cigarette smoke.

To Rate Doctors Can Be a Huge Help

Rating professionals is not a new concept for web sites. Most college students are familiar with rate your professor web sites that let them rate and review their professors. And thanks to consumer driven web sites, consumers are already familiar with rating their contractors, dry cleaners and other professionals hired for a job. But, now there are web sites that allow consumers to rate doctors.

Rating doctors however is not quite the same as rating other professionals, as many doctors who oppose the web site concept have pointed out. For one thing, if you don’t like your dry cleaner or contractor, and post a poor review of their services, it is fairly straight forward to assess blame. Your contractor, for example, can reply to your post and review about their performance, and give the public their version of events. The doctor, on the other hand, is bound by privacy laws and there fourth doesn’t have the luxury of a posting a public reply.

This situation has the potential to create postings that rate doctors as slightly one sided. To counter this side effect the more reputable web sites won’t post any anonymous postings, so any patient who chooses this public forum to rate doctors, does so with their name also attached. But despite these safeguards, a patient can choose to leave out information or exaggerate information to suite their rating, even if they don’t do it intentionally.

Advocates, who favor the rating system, argue that these web sites, allow patients to have a voice and be heard in the medical world. The medical world, as patient advocates point out, can be an intimidating system to navigate.

Some could argue the point that having a web site that allows patients to rate doctors levels the playing field and gives both sides some power and a voice. Doctors after all have been used to having the final say and having all of the power in these relationships. It has only been lately with the help of the internet that patients have been able to surf the web and get some insight into their own medical condition, tipping the sense of power into balance.

Still, despite the pros and cons of a system that can rate doctors as easily as it can rate your contractor, it is doubtful that these web sites will disappear or loose their ability to alter perceptions. However, patients who post reviews should strive to be accurate, factual and honest and consumers who read the reviews for guidance should be careful to not dismiss a doctor based on one bad review, bearing in mind that not all of the facts are being laid out from just one person’s perspective.

Doctors Want You to Advocate for Your Healthcare

Anyone who knows me knows of my ongoing knee surgery saga. Doctor after doctor, treatment after treatment – it’s frustrating. I’m a healthcare advocate and it’s an exasperating experience for me. I can only pray for the people who need help navigating the healthcare system and don’t know where to begin.

I recently saw a new orthopedic surgeon because the one I have currently cannot seem to understand why I still have pain three months after my surgery. “Well, you don’t have anything wrong with you structurally,” he said. “I am unclear as to why you are in pain.” When you are in pain, you don’t want to hear that your doctor doesn’t know why. More frustration, and no avenues as to how to treat it.

So I called my insurance company to see if they covered second opinions. They did, and I made an appointment with the new one that my physical therapist recommended.

As the doctor walked in with an eager young intern, he introduced himself and shook my hand firmly. It seems like we talked for a while, he didn’t rush me at all. He took the time to ask me what I felt was wrong and give me his opinion about my knee issues. He gave me a new diagnosis and some new different avenues of treatment as well, instead of sitting there with a dumbfounded look on his face. He actually told me that I no longer need a surgeon, that I need a rehab doctor to follow my condition at this time.

Not only that, he asked about me. He wanted to know how my pain affected me and my lifestyle. What my pain kept me from doing. When he asked me about my career, I told him that I was a healthcare advocate. And do you know what he said?

“That’s just great. I meet so many patients that don’t speak up during their appointments because they are intimidated by me. I wish patients would ask the questions they need to and utilize me as their physician. If they don’t, then what happens?”

This plea is coming from a doctor. Physicians want active patients that want to take part in their care (at least the physicians without an ego). Prepare for your appointments and get the most out of them.

Here are some ways to prepare for your appointment and utilize your doctor:

  • prepare your questions and concerns before your appointment
  • make sure you bring a photo ID, your insurance card and any copayment
  • speak with the doctor about your concerns and ask all the questions that you have
  • let the doctor discuss with you what they think is going on
  • if you are diagnosed with something, ask why that diagnosis was chosen
  • if the doctor prescribes a medication for you, ask why that medication was chosen and about its potential side effects
  • do not let fear or intimidation keep you from the goal of getting your best healthcare

Any doctor that you see should be happy that you are an active patient. If they’re not happy, then find another doctor that respects your opinion and wants to have you take in active role in your care.

Check out the ratings on your doctor at Healthgrades.com!